Dearest Duck, It’s Over! Love Pippin…

Even though we are now only in the second day of February, there is already an abundance of red hearts of all sizes adorning the windows of the local shops and restaurants and there are even Edible Love Hearts on offer as a Valentine's Day treat for our local pooches! Yes, February is the month for a profusion of chocolates, expensive red roses and some very dubious Valentine's cards but oh, what a month of anticipation as Cupid's Arrow flies forth! However, sadly not for our poet as February 1816 would be the month that his wife Lady Byron, the former Annabella Milbanke would ditch him!

Behold the Blessings of Lady Noel – Damn!

In the summer of 1821 in a letter to his sister, Augusta Leigh, as Byron was was lamenting the failure of his drama about Marino Faliero, the controversial Doge of Venice who had been executed in 1355, he was also less than sympathetic to the news that his mother-in-law had recovered from an illness. As we know, no one lives forever and the Lady Noel was no exception for a mere seven months after Lord B's most facetious letter; his Mamma-At-Law died on Monday January 28 in 1822...

Taking My Leave of Number 13?

On the eve of her departure from 13 Piccadilly Terrace, Annabella had confided in her former governess Mrs Clermont that "if ever I should be fool enough to be persuaded to return I shall never leave his house alive" - however, some 198 years later in January of 2014, the doors of 13 Piccadilly Terrace reopened; albeit in 12th scale for a feature in the Dolls' House Magazine for GMC Publications...

A Melancholy, ‘Honeft Man’…

Byron was noted for his open manner and of his tendency to admit his feelings of despondency, sorrow or his word of choice - melancholy. For his poetry is noted for it, his private journals speak of it and he was often candid about his "constitutional depression of Spirits" in letters to his friends. Although the study of genetics was unknown in Byron's time, he always believed that he was 'doomed' by the fact that he was a in the words of his mother a "true Byrrone" Despite his charm, his father was considered a fickle profligate and adulterer and with an irate temper, extreme moods and bouts of depression; Byron's mother Catherine Gordon was more than a match for 'Mad Jack' as he was known throughout society. In the light of his parents' temperaments and that death by suicide is hinted at on ALL sides of Byron's unique family; it is perhaps NOT surprising that Byron was frequently one unhappy chap...

Adieu Most Amiable Mamma…

In the hagiography which often passes for the writing of Byron's life, Catherine Gordon Byron is somewhat of a Marmite figure for you will either love her or you hate her! However, my hatred of Marmite is equal to the fondness that I have for the story of this most 'Amiable Mamma' who Byron described as 'A tender and peremptory parent who indulged me sometimes with holidays and now and then with a box on the ear.'

Let Me Have the Implora Pace!

On this day, July 16 and an incredible 23 years ago I celebrated the safe arrival of my youngest son Tom and in 1824 a further 194 years ago, the church of St Mary Magdalene in the town of Hucknall in Nottingham welcomed the safe arrival of Byron's remains for burial after his death at the age of 36 on April 19 in the town of Missolonghi in Greece...

Far from the Scenes of Birth and Youth…

That eye which had gleam'd as in flashed from Heav'n, - Whose glances by angles and demons seem'd given. - It anxiously gaz'd, but its language and lights As they faded were seal'd from mortality's sights. In the days following the news of Lord Byron's death in Greece on April 19 1824; his young widow …

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Blest Her! The Angel Suffers No More…

Your barbarous and hard hearted Brother has I am too firmly persuaded broken the heart that was devoted to him - and I doubt not will have pleasure in the Deed. She will not long exist, so he may glory in the Success of his endeavors. She is dreadfully ill and was last night and this day …

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I Have Suffered! Can It EVER Be Known?

On April 21, Byron penned one of his last letters to his 'Dearest Augusta' as he made plans to leave his home and his life in England behind him. He had signed the deed of separation on the afternoon of Sunday April 21 1816 signifying the end of his brief year-long marriage to Annabella and from the fatherhood of his five-month old daughter Ada. He left 13 Piccadilly Terrace on April 23, St George's Day, bound for Dover and finally departed from England on Thursday April 25 and was never to see Augusta, Annabella or Ada again...

I Once More Remind You I Am YOUR Child!

I received a most kind and affectionate letter from Lady Byron, and money, with offers of protection for myself and my child, and the power of quitting a neighbourhood which was most painful to me. This was in August 1840. I willingly and joyfully accepted these offers.... Lady Byron, proposed that I should accompany her …

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‘Tis a Pity There Were Three of Us!

By April 1816 Annabella having already contemplated the vagaries, distress and challenge that her brief marriage of one year to Byron had brought her and having made her decision to leave in February 1816, the 'Suffering Angel' was to remain formidable in her resolution and the process towards Annabella's desire to be 'securely separated' from Byron over 200 years ago was reaching an increasingly bitter, fraught and heart breaking conclusion. Despite Annabella's consistent avowal that she would not return to him, Byron had continued to object to the separation throughout the cold months of February and March with his belief that she had been manipulated by the demands of her parents and with mischief by her former nurse and governess Mrs Clermont. In 1816 the laws for divorce were complicated and in the absence of the legality of a wife's right to defend and assert her desire for a separation, the Courts usually awarded rights, property and children to the husband and it was with this in mind Annabella's legal team were preparing depositions in support of her claim...

Cheers! I Could Murder a Drink!

When Lady Byron left London and her husband in January 1816 she was to send him the following note: Dearest B., We arrived here safely - the child is the best of travellers. Now do leave off the abominable trade of versifying, and brandy, everything that is nau - - Byron was always the first to admit with brutal honesty that he …

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A Bad Romance? I WANT Revenge!

While listening to the radio on this Valentine's Day, the song Bad Romance by Lady GaGa has been on the play list AND more than once! I want your love And I want your revenge You and me could write a bad romance I want your love and All your love is revenge You and me could …

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